About your Search

20130318
20130326
STATION
CNNW 4
CSPAN 4
KQED (PBS) 4
KRCB (PBS) 3
MSNBCW 2
CSPAN2 1
KGO (ABC) 1
KQEH (PBS) 1
KTVU (FOX) 1
LANGUAGE
English 29
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)
and deficit thing. another is that i think the republican party has to make clear what its foreign policy is. it has had two wars for the past 12 years, people are still settling in and thinking, the voters have said, we don't like that. we're not for that. the republican party has to make clear what it stands for and it is going to have a little bit of debate to get there. those two big things and the policies that spring from them will make all of the difference, so will an eventual compelling presidential candidate. somebody who is involved right now. at the end of the day, it's the candidates who resolve a lot of unresolved things by taking a stand and speaking forcefully for it. >> that was bill clinton after walter mondale lost it. after jimmy carter lost. we had a dynamic governor who was reformed minded and brought those issues into the national forefront. he really helped recharge the democratic party. you know, the republican party is out to lunch. i watched cpac, karl. karl was a former friend. >> i thought i was a current friend? >> you're always a friend, you owe me some chili.
indyk who joins us from washington where he is the vice president and director for foreign policy at the brookings institution. ambassador indyk, good to have you back on the program, sir. >> thanks, tavis, good to be with you. tavis: i guess the start is whether or not i have overstated the case. there are some who believe as i intimated a moment ago that the president's very presence in israel that's to say, our president, barack obama, signals to some there might be renewed vigor, renewed possibility for peace between the israelis and palestinians and there are many more others, perhaps, as i read, who think it's a false hope, that the expectations on this need to be tamped down. where does ambassador indyk stand? >> certainly the white house has been trying to tamp down those expectations, including the president himself. he's going early in his second term, just a couple of days after the israeli government has been sworn in after their elections, so it's very hard to see what exactly could be done on this trip to
next, house foreign affairs committee chairman ed royce talks about u.s. policy towards the asia-pacific region including u.s. relations with china and north korea's nuclear program. then former national security adviser brzezinski discusses the situation in iraq at a forum marking the tenth anniversary of the war. and later, former state and treasury department officials discuss the orange of the islamic militant -- origin of the islamic militant group hezbollah and its global terrorist threat. >> also today retired general john allen who commanded forces in afghanistan discusses the progress of the war during his command and the future mission of the u.s. and nato in the country. general allen led the forces in afghanistan for 19 months from mid 2011 through february of this year. he'll be hosted by the brookings institution, and you can see his remarks live later in this morning at 10 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> tonight on "first ladies," called a bigamist and adulterer during her husband's 1828 presidential campaign, rachel jackson chis of an -- dies of an apparent heart attac
: julie senator graham says this is quote, an exhibit a of a failed foreign policy and this is why the president allegedly doesn't want the people to come forward. bin laden is on the run, and al-qaeda is alive and well and benghazi, and how the people were allegedly begging for help. and we know that about the ambassador and apparently these people would back up-- >> and senator graham has to create the anti-obama to-- that's not what it's about at all. >> i would caution you and say this, senator graham can allege what it wants and white house can allege what it wants. the more lessons drawn from this the better. the more testimony from congress is the better. and if it's done privately without jeopardizing the covert operatives i'm for it. instead of trotting out on the sunday talk shows where senator graham is trying to burnish his bona fides, as opposed to going out there and-- >> how much more can he do? >> he can't prove this? >> senator graham is a whistle blower. >> he can't proof anything. >> he's to get what he's entitled to. the president doesn't seem to honor or respec
on that journey with. that is trying to figure out what our foreign policy is. i have had a very hard time doing that. i am stumped on the answer in syria. i do not know what the answer is. we have waited so long to really do anything. it reminds me of iran in 2009 and we saw an opportunity against the regime. i find ourselves in a situation now where i do feel like we are reacting to this situation and if we go back to the beginning of the conflict and the net -- and the initial uprising of assad, you have the iran receive supporting the syrian regime on the one hand, and syrian fighter -- freedom fighters on the other hand. at that time, you could assume extremism would not have the ability to organize to this -- to the great extent they probably organize now. at the beginning, and i am asking yolks because you're at -- asking you because you were at these compositions, against a regime that is a supported obama -- supported by iran? i will keep it short because there is a lot i want to ask. >> to be very brief, congressman, i, personally, do not agree we waited so long. we were helping democr
of his top strategic foreign policy advisors and he assumes because that is the sentence that is focused on that is what he wants to come out of the press conference. >> bret: next up, the two leaders on syria and the developing situation with the possibility of chemical weapons. ♪ looking for a litter with natural ingredients that helps neutralize odors. discover tidy cats pure nature. uniquely formulated with cedar, pine, and corn. >>> i am deeply skeptical of any claim in fact it was the opposition that used chemical weapons. i made clear that use of chemical weapons is a game changer. i won't make an announcement today about the next steps because we have to gather the facts. when you start seeing weapons that can cause potential devastation, and mass casualties, a you let that genie out of the bottle, then you are looking potentially at especially more horrific scenes than we have already seen in syria. >> bret: president obama talking about the possibility of the chemical weapons were used in syria. the house intelligence chairman mike rogers says there is a high probably now the
use and throw away the key. i think there are people who would like a less aggressive foreign policy. there are all kinds of issues that don't neatly fit in the left/right paradigm that i think would help because we are not the doing well in a lot of the purple and blue states so we do need a candidate that would appeal across the left/right paradigm. >> chris: we have about 30 seconds left. your budget which would balance the budget your plan would balance the budget in five years. paul ryan's which has come under attack for balancing it in ten years. you introduced it three consecutive years if and the most votes was this weekend when you got 18. isn't that out o of the mainstream? >> the thing is i think the legislature is ten years pee the public.behind i introduced a bill to quit sending money to egypt. 9 o percent of americans agree with me and 80% of the senators disagree with me. i would argue that the senate is not up-to-date on what the people really want chris thank you for joining us and always good to talk with you, sir. >> thank you. >> chris: up next, the supreme court
. >> shepard: let's bring in michael ohandlan. specialeess in defense and foreign policy. >> hi. >> shepard: where are we now in this conflict? >> i think you and jonathan have been summarizing it well. you can say the insurgents have some momentum but everytime you feel like you make that case they suffer a setback or we're remind of their fractious nature, and the regime is still get can weapons from iran and i'm not seeing we're seeing a shift in. i it's a stalemate with successes on either side. the insurgents are doing a little better but not persuasive they'll take the country or drive assad from power. i hope sew but have not seen enough evidence. this could be a settling into a long situation in which the government holds some neighborhoods, the insurgents hold others and it keeps going for a very long time. >> with the president's trip to israel, the jordan, toothier talking to turkey, and then secretary kerry's trip to iraq, get the idea there's some consensus about what to do next. >> that's a fair point. i think you have been tracking this very well, and you also are aware of th
and director of the foreign policy program at the brookings institution in washington, d.c. and david makovsky is the director of the project on the middle east peace process at the washington institute for near east policy. welcome to both of you. martin, let me start with you. as the president goes to israel, what will he find in general terms in this new government? what do we know or not know? >> well, it's only a couple of days old. so it's a very hard to tell exactly what it's going to shape up to. what we have is right wing party with a shift within the likud further in the right in terms of its composition. we have a large center party, lapid, this new rising star. then to his left is tzipi livni who was the only candidate to campaign on the two-state solution. he only got 56. >> brown: somehow they all worked together or were supposed to work together. >> there's a special glue on the seats of israeli cabinet chairs which kind of keep them stuck there for a while at least. they have to respond to their constituency. that is the key point here. their constituents wants them to focus on
netanyahu and called the u.s. and the jewish state unbreakable. mr. obama also covered big foreign policy issues including the iranian threat and the civil war in syria. cnn's john king is live in jerusalem with the latest. john, all seemed very maty and chummy. but underneath all that, what is the reality of the state of the relationship between america and israel right now? >> reporter: there's no question, piers, obvious to the world, not just to these two leaders, they've had a frosty and unfriendly relationship. president obama is left of center, believes the prime minister netanyahu has said some things he finds insulting or didn't like. prime minister netanyahu right of center, supported romney in the last presidential election, has at times stopped at president obama, my language, doesn't get it. both of these guys just won elections. they are in the words of a top american official the other day, stuck with each other. and it's very crystal clear today, both of them have decided to try to turn a new page. are they going to be best friends, i think not. but are they going to be be
: joining me martin indyk, director of foreign policy brookings institution, also a former u.s. ambassador to israel. and itamar rabinovich served as israel ambassador to the united states. at the same time he was chief negotiator with the syrian government and president and founder of the israeli institute. i'm pleased to have both of them at this table, at this time, when the president i saying some very interesting things in israel. so welcome. >> thank you. >> thank you. >> rose: characterize this speech by the president. >> this speech was typical obama at his best, working his oratorical magic on a crowd that lapped it up. he spoke very convincingly about his commitment to israel's security and his understanding of their security dilemmas. and particularly underlined what he was going to prevent iran from getting nuclear weaponsment buthen he went into a rif about peace and the necessity of peace and the possibility of peace, and why peace has to be just, even saying put yourself, you israelis put yourself in the shoes of the palestinians. and talked over the heads of the leadership
away the key. so, i think there are people who would like a less aggressive foreign policy and there are all kinds of issues that don't neatly left in the left-right paradigm that i think would help, because we're not doing very well in a lot of these states, purple and blue states and we need a candidate that would appeal across the left-right paradigm. >> chris: briefly, 30 seconds left, though. your budget which would balance the budget, your plan, would balance the budget in five years, paul ryan's which has come under attack for balancing it in ten years, you have introduced it three consecutive years in the senate, the most votes you got was this weekend when you got 18 of 100 senators, isn't it out of the mainstream? >> well, the thing is, i think the legislature is about ten years behind the public. for example, i have introduced amendments to quit sending money to egypt and build bridges here in the the united states instead of in egypt. and i bet you 90% of the american people agree with me but 80% of my senators disagree. i argue the senate is not up-to-date with
funding. the same way democrats have often done on some foreign policy issues in the past with a republican president. stop the money is how you stop the law. but i think it's going to be a you have tough thing to do. it's, again, once the program gets in place, it's hard to take it back. and one of these things the governors have done when they let the federal government set up the system is that takes the states out of having any ability to set up the exchange themself. i mean, it gives the state less say and the federal government more say. that's going to be a tough thing for the republicans. you know, republicans want more say in the states. so even in times of posing obamacare, they're actually giving more power to the federal government. it's very complicated issue. of. jon: well, it is complicated, and it's three years old, and most of its provisions really haven't kicked in yet. that's what remains to be seen, how, you know, people adjust to it as they actually have to sign on for this thing. joe trippi -- >> that's right. jon: -- we'll continue to keep a watch on
, the president's approval on handling foreign policy is more or less the split 46% approve, 40% disapprove. he was in the country 11 times over the last decade. here is a sample. >> here is the main palace, the living quarters. it was struck in the first 36 hours of war. it is in this courtroom that he could face justice. he could be in this very chair on trial before the judicial system that he controlled and manipulated for 35 years. reporter: members of the iraqi government say they will likely keep the arc of victory as a reminder of just how brutal saddam hussein really was. jenna: we are so used to seeing him and not drill. >> a long time and a few pounds ago. jenna: what are your reflections? >> my first time was with secretary rumsfeld in iraq. really from 9/11 onward. on the first trip, it was in a bus like a giant fishbowl. a glass bus going down the middle of baghdad. there was not an insurgency. we didn't have jackets on as we worked through baghdad. that dramatically changed over time, as you know. it really exploded to the point surge that was implemented under general betray pet
nations, united states is coming up too much with foreign policy and helping the fallen in getting involved too much. -- getting involved with foreign nations too much. u.n. another call on the did you want to weigh in on that? way it ist is not the seen in the world, where people feel the united states is not engaged enough after recent years. host: nathan guttman is with jewish daily forward and said arikat with al-quds. question had a quick and i would like a clarification of it. that the two me state solution is dead. the situation is static. here is my question. understood that all of the palestinians in the west bay and in gaza, are they subject -- in the west bank and in gaza, are they subject to israel? do we have a situation where palestinians do not get rights? guttman? the minority of the palestinians in east jerusalem do have is really i.d. cards. arelegal terms is that they an occupied population. guest: absolutely. the occupation that has gone on for far too long has denied palestinians the most basic of rights. israelis can arrest people, as we have seen last night.
levin, chairman of the armed services committee, and u.s. defense and foreign policy. later a discussion on expanding coverage under the health care law for the lgbt community. >> president obama is set to arrive in israel on wednesday, followed by a was -- a visit to the west bank and a final stop in jordan, during his first overseas trip in his second term. two former middle east advisers discussed theouse president's trip. from the washington institute, this is 90 minutes. >> good afternoon. and welcome to the washington institute. i am the director of the institute. i'm very happy to welcome all of you today. just at the outside, if i could remind you, cell phone off please. not just on a vibrate. this event is being live streamed for our thousands of fans around the world. the event is being broadcast by c-span. -- say ng you can say can and will be used against you. we are gathered here today because president obama is off for the inaugural overseas visit of his second term. east,going to the middle israel, to the west bank, and to jordan. his itinerary is very different than the i
to be realistic. the young people who are there and who applauded ally will not be shaping foreign policy and we have to deal with the government that exists. it's a coalition government of really intense contradictions and we, therefore, have to be very clear in asserting what we consider to be the vital interests of the united states which are automatically good for israel. because if the united states is healthy and strong and predominant in the region, israel is totally secure. let's not forget, sdentally something very important which the press hasn't played up at all in recent months but yet it is a very telling fact. israel and the united states tend to be almost completely isolated in the middle east. not only in terms of the middle eastern countries but in terms of world opinion. look at the vote in the u.n. when we made every single effort possible to discourage countries from voting in favor of palestinian membership in the u.n. how many votes out of 190, out of 190 did we get? we found only seven countries to support us. this tells us something. and, therefore, we have to be very, ve
foreign policy? how are we doing muddling through this remarkable period of uncertainty? >> you know, i think we're muddling through is the best way i can put it. certain steps i think that have been positive, many that have been negative. i think the president when we saw the demonstrations in 2011 what the president did in calling for the end of hosni mubarak to step down this is a recognition this is a big deal and we need to get on the side of the populations understanding the public will be more empowered. other governments dictatorship, regimes in the gulf, close allies let's admit nondemocratic allies saw that and were frightened and they bring this up when they talk to their american partners. >> the saudis were on the phone. >> we saw you do that to mubarak. are we next? there are consequences to doing that. it's a error and we're feeling our way around. nine fairness we didn't immediately step in. we didn't see people revolting and automatically take the side of the people. we waited on that. we are late across the region. we're supportive of a syrian revolution and clamping
of improvement, but the unemployment rate remains elevated. the house foreign affairs committee examines of the u.s. to the syrian civil war. ben bernanke on monetary policy. a news conference with president obama and prime minister netanyahu. >> 70,000 people have been killed since protests began again syrian president assad. u.s. ambassador to syria, robert ford, testified at a house foreign affairs committee along with state department and usaid officials examining the u.s. response to the syrian civil war. this is two hours and 15 minutes. >> this hearing will come to order to sto. we need to review the syrian crisis. it was two years ago last week on the nightly news that we saw those protesters walking through .he street, chanting, peaceful what the world saw next without the syrian forces opened up with small arms fire on the marchers. over the ensuing weeks, that was followed by materially -- artillery barrage is and tanks and aerial apartment and finally i scud missiles into cities. two years into that syria and uprising. years, u.s. policy has been a drift. the obama administration saw
. >> we all no asia is on the rise. he served as singapore's foreign secretary and the dean of the country's school of public policy. he has a new book out "the great convergence, asia, the west and the logic of one world." welcome back. you start the book with good news. since everybody in the united states and the west has been feeling blue, tell us what the good news is with and why we should be happy. >> actually i'm surprised by the kind of level of posseessimism europe and america. the world has never been in better shape if you look at the view. the number was dying in dying in conflicts is the lowest it has ever been. in term of global poverty the only u.n. goal is having more than having by 2015. and the middle class, and this is a really stunning news, if you look at where asia is today, they are 500 million people living in middle-class living standards today in 2013 in asia. by 2020, which is seven years in now, the number will explode from 500 million to 1.75 billion. an increase of 3.5 times in seven years. we've never seen this before in human history. that's going to change
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)